Tuesday, 30 December 2014

Fried Parmesan Zucchini Slices

One of the many things my husband's family taught me was to prepare and cook vegetables with respect.   My father in law was a market gardener as well as an electrician and he grew a huge diversity of vegetables.



As my own father disliked crumbed food I had never eaten breadcrumbed, fried zucchini until my husband cooked it for me early in our relationship.


We grow zucchini in our garden all year around.  Each plant lasts for about 2 months at which time we start off another 4 plants for a continual supply of flowers to stuff, and zucchinis to enjoy.


Slice the zucchini lengthwise into 5mm slices.
Beat two eggs with 2 tablespoons milk in a bowl. Place 1 cup fresh breadcrumbs mixed with 1/2 cup dried breadcrumbs and 1/3 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese into another bowl.
Dip the zucchini slices into the egg than transfer to the breadcrumbs and coat on each side.
Place onto a plate ready for frying.




Heat a medium size frying pan to medium high heat.
Pour in 1/2 cup vegetable or canola oil and let it heat for 1 minute.
Gently place zucchini slices into the oil, ensure they are not touching.
Fry for 1 - 2 minutes for the first side, gently turn over and fry second side for 1 -2 minutes.
Place onto a paper towel lined platter to drain.
Sprinkle with fine sea salt and freshly cracked black pepper.  



Enjoy alone, or with crusty bread or as a side dish with a main meal.
These can be enjoyed hot but are equally good at room temperature.
If you don't cook them all the readily prepared zucchini slices can be stored in the fridge overnight,
either uncooked ready for frying, or cooked.

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Fried Parmesan Zucchini Slices 

2 zucchini 
2 eggs
2 tablespoons milk
1 cup fresh breadcrumbs
1/2 cup dried breadcrumbs
1/3 cup parmesan cheese, grated
Vegetable oil for shallow frying
(Vegetable oil keeps the zucchini crisp, olive oil will make them soggy)

Slice the zucchini lengthwise into 5mm slices.
Beat two eggs with 2 tablespoons milk in a bowl. 
Place fresh and dried breadcrumbs with the freshly grated parmesan cheese into another bowl.
Dip the zucchini slices into the egg than transfer to the breadcrumbs and coat on each side.
Place onto a plate ready for frying.

Heat a medium sized frying pan over medium high heat.
Pour in 1/2 cup vegetable or canola oil and let that heat for 1 minute.
Gently place zucchini slices into the oil, ensure they are not touching.
Fry for 1 - 2 minutes for the first side, gently turn over and fry second side for 1 -2 minutes or until lightly golden brown.  Add a little more oil between batches.
Place onto a paper towel lined platter to drain.
Sprinkle with fine sea salt and freshly cracked black pepper.  


Buon appetito, enjoy Merryn xx







Monday, 29 December 2014

Edamame so quick to cook

I have heard about Edamame but living in the country and the restaurants we enjoy here and also when away I have never seen it on a menu.
My hubby asked me "what on earth are you growing in this patch of ground?"
I replied "soy beans so I can try Edamame"  which has been popular during the last year.
An old Masterchef contestant, Courtney Roulston was preparing a salad during a recent in-house cooking demonstration in our local hardware store and she had a bag of frozen edamame beans.   Courtney said "You can't buy them  here, but you can get them in Asian grocery stores".  
Yes, this adds to the frustration of shopping in a rural area.


Here is the pretty soy bean plant, with the young pods proudly hanging in groups.

Each soy bean pod was roughly 5cm in length.
I picked them from the plant, rinsed them in a colander.
Bringing water to a rolling boil in a saucepan, I added 1 teaspoon salt.
Then dropped the beans in all at once, put on the lid, turned heat to medium low and
immediately put the timer on for 5 minutes.


After 5 minutes I turned off the heat, and poured the edamame into a colander
and refreshed them by running cold water over the top.



Then I poured them into a pretty bowl and sprinkled them with plenty of freshly ground sea salt.


You eat them by popping the peas out of the pod directly into your mouth.
They have a unique taste, similar to a pea but with more flavour.
It is a satisfying action and very enjoyable.

Will I grow them again?  Definitey as now I know what all of the fuss is about and
I did enjoy these fresh, wholesome Edamame.

Buon appetito, enjoy Merryn xx